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Exploring Tanzania African Art

Exploring Tanzania African Art

December 16, 2022

Tingatinga paintings are a unique and vibrant art form that originated in Tanzania in the 1960s. Named after its founder, Edward Said Tingatinga, this style of painting is known for its bold colors, simple shapes, and whimsical depictions of African wildlife and everyday life. At www.tingatingaart.com, we offer a wide selection of high-quality Tanzania art, each one hand-painted by talented Tanzanian artists. From colorful elephants and zebras to scenes of village life, our collection of tingatinga paintings is sure to bring joy and a touch of African flair to any space.

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Tanzania, a country located in East Africa, is known for its diverse and rich cultural heritage. The art of Tanzania reflects the country's history, traditions, beliefs, and social structures.

Tanzanian African art encompasses a wide range of artistic expressions, including sculptures, masks, paintings, jewelry, textiles, and performances, and is deeply intertwined with the daily lives of the Tanzanian people.

One of the most distinctive features of Tanzanian African art is its connection to traditional African religions and rituals. Many Tanzanian tribes, such as the Maasai, Sukuma, and Makonde, have unique artistic traditions that are intertwined with their spiritual practices.

For example, the Maasai, known for their distinctive red clothing and intricate beadwork, use their art to express their beliefs in the importance of cattle, their primary source of livelihood, and their spiritual connection to the land and animals.

Sculpture is an essential form of artistic expression in Tanzanian African art. Wood carving is a prominent technique used to create intricate sculptures of animals, human figures, and deities.

These sculptures are often used in traditional rituals and ceremonies, as well as for decorative and functional purposes. The Makonde tribe, known for their exceptional wood carving skills, creates intricate and highly detailed sculptures, often depicting abstract and supernatural beings.

Masks are another significant form of Tanzanian African art. Masks are used in various rituals and ceremonies, such as initiation rites, funerals, and harvest festivals. They are believed to possess spiritual powers and are used to communicate with ancestors or deities. Tanzanian masks are often characterized by bold designs, vibrant colors, and intricate patterns. The Gogo tribe, for example, creates elaborate masks adorned with cowrie shells and feathers, which are used in dances and performances to invoke ancestral spirits.

Painting is also a prominent form of Tanzanian African art. Traditional paintings are often done on cloth, wood, or canvas and feature bold colors, abstract designs, and symbolic representations of nature, animals, and human figures. These paintings are used to tell stories, convey moral lessons, and celebrate cultural events. Tingatinga painting, a unique style of art that originated in Tanzania in the 1960s, is known for its colorful and playful depictions of animals and scenes from everyday life. Tingatinga art has gained international recognition and has become a significant part of Tanzanian visual culture.

Jewelry and textiles are essential aspects of Tanzanian African art, often reflecting the country's rich cultural diversity. The Maasai, for instance, are famous for their intricate beadwork, creating colorful and intricate patterns on their clothing, jewelry, and accessories. The Sukuma tribe, known for their cotton farming, produces vibrant and intricately woven textiles that are used for clothing, household items, and ceremonial purposes. These textiles often feature geometric patterns, bright colors, and symbolic motifs that are unique to each tribe.

Performing arts also play a vital role in Tanzanian African art. Music, dance, and theater are intrinsic to Tanzanian culture and are often used in religious ceremonies, social events, and celebrations. Traditional Tanzanian music is characterized by its rhythmic beats, vocal harmonies, and use of traditional instruments such as drums, flutes, and lyres. Traditional dances are often accompanied by music and are performed with intricate movements, costumes, and props, which convey cultural stories and traditions. The Ngoma, a traditional dance performed by various Tanzanian tribes, is known for its energetic movements and colorful costumes.

Tanzanian African art is diverse and encompasses various forms of artistic expressions. Below we will examine some of these art forms in greater depth:

  1. Sculpture: Wood carving is a significant technique used in Tanzanian African art to create intricate sculptures of animals, human figures, and deities. The Makonde tribe is well-known for their exceptional wood carving skills, creating detailed and often abstract sculptures that are used in traditional rituals and ceremonies. 

    Stone carving is another prevalent form of sculpture in Tanzania, particularly in regions with access to abundant stone resources. Stone sculptures are often used for decorative and monumental purposes, such as in architecture, public spaces, and memorial sites. Soapstone, granite, and serpentine are commonly used stones in Tanzanian stone carving, and the sculptures can range from small figurines to large-scale installations.

    Contemporary Tanzanian sculpture also encompasses a wide range of styles and mediums, with artists often experimenting with new materials, techniques, and themes. Many Tanzanian sculptors draw inspiration from their cultural heritage, but also incorporate modern influences and global artistic trends into their works. This includes mixed media sculptures, installations, and abstract sculptures that tackle a wide range of contemporary issues, such as social justice, environmental conservation, and cultural identity.

    Tanzanian sculpture is not only valued for its artistic and aesthetic merits but also for its cultural significance. Many sculptures are used in religious rituals, ceremonies, and celebrations, as well as for personal and community expressions of identity and heritage. Tanzanian sculpture serves as a tangible representation of the country's rich cultural heritage and artistic traditions, and continues to evolve and thrive in contemporary art scenes, both locally and internationally.

  2. Masks: Masks hold significant cultural and spiritual significance in Tanzanian African art. Masks are used in various rituals and ceremonies, such as initiation rites, funerals, and harvest festivals, and are believed to possess spiritual powers. Tanzanian masks are often characterized by bold designs, vibrant colors, and intricate patterns. The Gogo tribe, for example, creates elaborate masks adorned with cowrie shells and feathers, which are used in dances and performances to invoke ancestral spirits. 

    One of the most well-known types of masks in Tanzania is the Ngoma mask, which is used by the Makonde people in their traditional dance performances. The Ngoma mask is typically carved from wood and is characterized by its bold and expressive features, often depicting human or animal forms. These masks are used in traditional dances and performances to convey cultural messages, tell stories, and communicate with ancestral spirits.

    Another type of mask commonly found in Tanzania is the Gule Wamkulu mask, used by the Chewa people in their initiation ceremonies and male secret societies. The Gule Wamkulu masks are often large and elaborate, featuring intricate carvings, colorful paintwork, and adorned with various materials such as beads, feathers, and animal skins. These masks are believed to represent ancestral spirits and are used in ceremonial dances and performances that are an important part of Chewa cultural practices.

    Other ethnic groups in Tanzania, such as the Nyamwezi, Sukuma, and Hehe, also have their unique styles of masks used in traditional ceremonies, dances, and performances. These masks can vary in size, materials, and designs, but all hold cultural significance and are crafted with great attention to detail and artistic skill.

    In addition to traditional masks, contemporary Tanzanian artists also create masks as a form of contemporary art. These masks may be made from a variety of materials, including wood, metal, fabric, and mixed media, and may incorporate modern artistic techniques and themes. Contemporary Tanzanian masks can be found in galleries, museums, and art exhibitions, showcasing the ongoing evolution and creativity of Tanzanian mask-making traditions.

  3. Painting: Traditional painting is also an important form of Tanzanian African art. Paintings are often done on cloth, wood, or canvas and feature bold colors, abstract designs, and symbolic representations of nature, animals, and human figures. Tingatinga painting, a unique style of art that originated in Tanzania in the 1960s, is known for its colorful and playful depictions of animals and scenes from everyday life. Tingatinga art has gained international recognition and has become a significant part of Tanzanian visual culture.

    The Tingatinga style of painting is a unique style of African art that originated in Tanzania in the 1960s. It is known for its vibrant colors, bold designs, and playful depictions of animals and scenes from everyday life. Tingatinga art has gained international recognition and has become a significant part of Tanzanian visual culture.

    The history of Tingatinga painting can be traced back to a man named Edward Saidi Tingatinga, who was born in Mozambique and later moved to Tanzania in the 1950s. Tingatinga was a self-taught artist who began painting using discarded materials such as masonite boards and bicycle paint. He developed a distinctive style of painting that featured bright colors, simple forms, and bold outlines, influenced by traditional African art and the natural surroundings of Tanzania.

    Tingatinga's unique style of painting quickly gained popularity among locals and tourists alike. His artworks were known for their affordability and accessibility, making them popular among Tanzanian households as decorative pieces. Tingatinga also started teaching his painting techniques to other aspiring artists, leading to the establishment of a Tingatinga School of Art in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania's largest city.

    The Tingatinga style of painting is characterized by its distinctive features, which include vibrant colors, bold outlines, and simplified forms. Animals such as elephants, lions, zebras, and birds are common subjects in Tingatinga paintings, often depicted in a stylized and whimsical manner. The use of bright, contrasting colors and bold patterns creates a sense of vibrancy and liveliness in the artworks. The paintings often feature simple backgrounds that highlight the main subject, and the use of black outlines adds a sense of definition and structure to the paintings.

    Tingatinga painting has become not only a popular form of artistic expression but also a significant economic activity in Tanzania. Many artists and art collectors value Tingatinga artworks for their aesthetic appeal, cultural significance, and commercial value. Tingatinga paintings are sold in local markets, galleries, and art exhibitions, and are also exported to other countries, contributing to the livelihoods of many Tanzanian artists and their families.

  4. Jewelry and Textiles: Jewelry and textiles are intrinsic to Tanzanian African art and often reflect the country's rich cultural diversity. The Maasai tribe is renowned for their intricate beadwork, creating colorful and elaborate patterns on their clothing, jewelry, and accessories. The Sukuma tribe, known for their cotton farming, produces vibrant and intricately woven textiles that are used for clothing, household items, and ceremonial purposes. These textiles often feature geometric patterns, bright colors, and symbolic motifs that are unique to each tribe. 

    Tanzanian jewelry is often made using natural materials such as shells, bone, and seeds. Beads are also a common material used in jewelry-making, with traditional Maasai beadwork being a particularly popular style. Maasai beadwork often features bright colors and geometric patterns, and is used to create a range of jewelry items, including necklaces, bracelets, and earrings.

    In addition to traditional beadwork, Tanzanian jewelry makers also create pieces using precious metals and gemstones. Gold is a popular material for jewelry in Tanzania, with many skilled artisans producing intricate designs that incorporate traditional African motifs. Tanzanian jewelry is often made using age-old techniques, passed down from generation to generation.

  5. Performing Arts: Music, dance, and theater are vital aspects of Tanzanian African art and are often used in religious ceremonies, social events, and celebrations. Traditional Tanzanian music is characterized by rhythmic beats, vocal harmonies, and the use of traditional instruments such as drums, flutes, and lyres. Traditional dances are often accompanied by music and are performed with intricate movements, costumes, and props that convey cultural stories and traditions. The Ngoma, a traditional dance performed by various Tanzanian tribes, is known for its energetic movements and colorful costumes.

  6. Pottery and Basketry: Pottery and basketry are also significant forms of Tanzanian African art. Different Tanzanian tribes create unique pottery and baskets using traditional techniques and materials. For example, the Sukuma tribe is known for their pottery, creating intricate vessels and containers using clay and traditional firing methods. The Zigua tribe is known for their intricate basketry, weaving baskets and containers from natural fibers such as grasses and palm leaves.

  7. Literature: Tanzanian literature is rich and diverse, encompassing a range of genres, including poetry, novels, short stories, and drama. Many Tanzanian writers have been recognized both nationally and internationally for their contributions to literature. Some notable Tanzanian writers include Shaaban Robert, Euphrase Kezilahabi, and Faraji Katalambulla. Tanzanian literature often addresses important themes such as social justice, politics, and cultural identity.

     Here's some more information about literature in Tanzania:

    Swahili Literature:

    Swahili is the national language of Tanzania and is widely spoken throughout East Africa. Swahili literature has a long history, dating back to the 9th century, with the earliest known Swahili manuscripts being religious texts written in Arabic script. Over time, Swahili literature has expanded to include poetry, novels, plays, and short stories, and has become an important part of Tanzania's cultural heritage.

    Tanzanian writers often draw on their experiences of life in Tanzania, exploring themes such as love, family, tradition, and social change. Some of the most prominent Swahili writers include Shaaban Robert, who is considered the father of modern Swahili literature, and Euphrase Kezilahabi, whose work often explores themes of identity and cultural heritage.

    English Literature:

    English is also widely spoken in Tanzania, and many Tanzanian writers produce works in English. Tanzanian English-language literature often focuses on issues such as post-colonial identity, social injustice, and cultural clash. Some notable English-language Tanzanian writers include Abdulrazak Gurnah, who has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and Doreen Baingana, whose work often explores the experiences of women in Uganda and Tanzania.

    Tanzania has a thriving literary scene, with a number of literary festivals and book fairs taking place throughout the year. The Soma Book Cafe in Dar es Salaam is a popular venue for book launches, readings, and discussions, and the Nipe Fagio Literary Festival is an annual event that brings together writers and readers from Tanzania and beyond.

    Overall, literature is an important part of Tanzania's cultural heritage, and its writers and poets continue to make significant contributions to the country's artistic and intellectual life.

  8. Film: Tanzania has a growing film industry, with a number of talented filmmakers producing movies that have gained international recognition. Some of the most famous Tanzanian films include "Tanzania Transit," "Kiumeni," and "House of Talent." Tanzanian films often explore important social and political issues facing the country, such as poverty, corruption, and the struggle for independence. 

    Tanzanian cinema dates back to the 1960s, with the production of the country's first feature film, "Africa, I Will Fleece You" (1965), directed by John Marshall. This was followed by a series of films in the 1970s and 1980s, often produced by the government-run Tanzania Film Company.

    In the 1990s, the Tanzanian film industry underwent a significant shift as a new generation of independent filmmakers emerged, often working outside of the government-run film industry. This new wave of filmmakers produced films that were more experimental in style and focused on contemporary social and political issues.

    Current state:

    Today, the Tanzanian film industry is thriving, with filmmakers working in a range of genres, including drama, comedy, and documentary. The Zanzibar International Film Festival, which was founded in 1997, has become an important platform for showcasing Tanzanian and African cinema to a global audience.

    Tanzanian filmmakers often work with limited budgets and face significant challenges in terms of funding and distribution. Nevertheless, many Tanzanian films have received critical acclaim and have been featured in international film festivals. For example, the film "The White Masai" (2005), directed by Hermine Huntgeburth and based on a best-selling novel by the same name, received international recognition and was shown at the Toronto International Film Festival.

    Tanzanian filmmakers often explore themes related to cultural identity, social issues, and historical events. For example, the film "Soul Boy" (2010), directed by Hawa Essuman, tells the story of a young boy in Nairobi who must confront the supernatural to save his father. The film was praised for its unique perspective on African culture and traditions.

  9. Woodcarving: Woodcarving is an important traditional art form in Tanzania, with many skilled artisans creating intricate carvings that depict a variety of subjects, from animals to people to abstract designs. Tanzanian woodcarvers use a range of tools to create their pieces, including knives, chisels, and saws. The wood used in carving can vary, with ebony, mahogany, and rosewood being some of the most popular choices. 

    Woodcarvers in Tanzania use a range of materials, including ebony, rosewood, and mahogany, to create intricate carvings of animals, people, and cultural symbols. They also use a variety of tools, including chisels, knives, and hammers, to shape and refine the wood.

    One of the most popular types of woodcarving in Tanzania is the carving of traditional masks. These masks are used in a range of traditional ceremonies and performances, and are often decorated with intricate patterns and symbols. The Makonde people, who live in southern Tanzania, are particularly well-known for their woodcarving skills, and their masks are highly valued by collectors and art enthusiasts around the world.

    Tanzanian woodcarvers also create a range of other items, including bowls, figurines, and sculptures. Many of these items feature traditional African designs and motifs, such as animals, tribal patterns, and symbols of strength and unity.

    In addition to traditional woodcarving, Tanzanian woodcarvers are also known for their contemporary art pieces, which often blend traditional African styles with modern artistic techniques. Some woodcarvers create large-scale sculptures that are displayed in public spaces, while others focus on creating intricate, smaller-scale pieces that are sold in galleries and markets.

    Overall, woodcarving is an important part of Tanzania's cultural heritage and artistic expression. Tanzanian woodcarvers continue to create beautiful and unique pieces that showcase their skill and creativity, and their work is appreciated by people all over the world.

  10. Beadwork: Beadwork is another important traditional art form in Tanzania, with skilled artisans creating intricate designs using a variety of beads and other materials. Beadwork can be found in a range of objects, from jewelry to clothing to household items. Many beadwork designs are inspired by traditional African patterns and symbols, and often have important cultural or spiritual significance. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in beadwork in Tanzania, with young artists incorporating modern styles and techniques into their work. 

    Beadwork is a traditional art form in Tanzania that has been practiced for centuries. The intricate and colorful beadwork created by Tanzanian artisans is known for its beauty and craftsmanship, and is often used to make jewelry, clothing, and other decorative items.

    Beadwork in Tanzania is particularly associated with the Maasai people, who are known for their intricate beadwork designs. Maasai beadwork often features bold colors, geometric patterns, and intricate designs. The beads used in Maasai beadwork are often made from natural materials such as bone, wood, and seeds, and are typically sourced from local materials.

    The Maasai use beadwork to create a variety of items, including necklaces, bracelets, and earrings, as well as items such as belts, bags, and sandals. Each item is carefully crafted by hand, with intricate designs that often have symbolic meaning.

    For example, a Maasai necklace might feature a pattern of alternating red and blue beads, with each color representing a different aspect of Maasai culture. Red might represent bravery and courage, while blue represents the sky and the natural world. Other beadwork designs might depict animals, such as the lion, which is an important symbol in Maasai culture.

    Beadwork is not just limited to the Maasai, however. Other tribes in Tanzania also have their own unique beadwork traditions, with designs that vary depending on the region and cultural group. The Chaga people, for example, are known for their intricate beadwork designs that incorporate natural materials such as seeds and shells.

    Today, beadwork continues to be an important art form in Tanzania, with many skilled artisans producing intricate and beautiful pieces. Tanzanian beadwork is valued not just for its aesthetic beauty, but also for its cultural significance, serving as a symbol of traditional African artistry and heritage.

  11. Batik: Batik is a textile art form that involves using wax and dye to create intricate designs on fabric. Tanzanian batik artists often use natural motifs, such as flowers and animals, in their designs. 

    Batik is a traditional textile art form that is widely practiced in Tanzania. Batik involves using wax and dye to create intricate designs on fabric. The wax is applied to the fabric using a tool called a tjanting, which allows the artist to create detailed patterns and designs. Once the wax is applied, the fabric is dyed in a solution of water and fabric dye. The areas of the fabric covered in wax resist the dye and remain the original color of the fabric. This process can be repeated with different colors and designs to create a layered and complex final product.

    Batik has a long history in Tanzania, and is considered to be an important cultural art form. The technique is believed to have originated in Indonesia, but has been adapted and evolved in Tanzania to create a unique style that is reflective of the country's rich cultural heritage. Tanzanian batik artists often use natural motifs, such as flowers, birds, and animals, in their designs, as well as incorporating traditional African patterns and symbols.

    One of the most well-known centers of Tanzanian batik production is in the village of Bagamoyo, located on the country's eastern coast. Bagamoyo has a long history of producing high-quality batik, and the village is home to a number of talented batik artists and artisans. In recent years, Bagamoyo has become a popular destination for tourists interested in learning about batik production and purchasing unique handcrafted textiles.

    Tanzanian batik is highly valued for its beauty, durability, and cultural significance. The art form plays an important role in the country's economy, with many artisans and textile producers relying on batik production as a source of income. Additionally, Tanzanian batik is recognized internationally for its quality and unique style, and has been exhibited in galleries and museums around the world.

  12. Mosaics: Tanzanian artists create beautiful mosaics using a variety of materials, including tiles, glass, and stones. Mosaics can be found in public spaces, such as parks and buildings, as well as in private homes. 

    Mosaics are a popular form of art in Tanzania and can be found in a variety of public spaces, including parks, buildings, and even on the streets. Mosaics are created by assembling small pieces of material, such as tiles, glass, and stones, into a larger image or design.

    Tanzanian mosaic artists use a range of materials to create their pieces, often incorporating locally-sourced stones and tiles into their work. Some mosaics feature intricate geometric patterns, while others depict natural landscapes or scenes from everyday life.

    One notable example of Tanzanian mosaic art is the Mosaic Tingatinga House in Dar es Salaam. This three-story building is covered in colorful mosaics depicting various animals, plants, and cultural motifs. The building serves as a tribute to the late Tanzanian artist Edward Tingatinga, who was famous for his colorful and bold paintings.

    In addition to public spaces, mosaics can also be found in private homes and businesses throughout Tanzania. Many mosaic artists work on commission, creating custom pieces for clients that incorporate their specific design preferences and needs.

  13. Carvings from horns and bones: Tanzanian artisans create intricate carvings from animal horns and bones, often depicting animals, people, and cultural symbols. 

    Carvings made from animal horns and bones are a traditional form of art in Tanzania, particularly among the Maasai people. These carvings are often intricate and detailed, and can depict a range of subjects, including animals, people, and cultural symbols.

    The Maasai people, who are known for their distinctive dress and culture, have a long tradition of using animal parts to create art and tools. Carvings made from animal horns and bones are one example of this tradition, and have been produced for centuries.

    Horn carvings are often made from the horns of cows, goats, or other animals, and can range in size from small decorative items to larger pieces that are used for ceremonial purposes. The carvings are created using a range of traditional tools, including knives, chisels, and sandpaper, and may be decorated with beads or other materials.

    Bone carvings, on the other hand, are made from animal bones, often from cows or goats. These carvings can also be quite intricate and detailed, and may depict animals, people, or cultural symbols. Bone carvings are created using similar techniques to horn carvings, and may also be decorated with beads or other materials.

    Today, horn and bone carvings are often sold to tourists as souvenirs or decorative items. However, they continue to play an important role in Tanzanian culture, particularly among the Maasai people, who use these carvings in their traditional ceremonies and rituals. They are also an important part of Tanzania's artistic heritage, and are valued for their beauty and cultural significance.

  14. Photography: Tanzanian photographers have gained international recognition for their work, which often focuses on the country's people and landscapes. Tanzanian photographers use a range of techniques, from traditional film photography to digital manipulation, to create their images.

    Photography is an art form that has gained popularity in Tanzania over the past few decades, with many talented photographers producing stunning images that capture the country's people, landscapes, and culture. Here's some more information about photography in Tanzania:

    Photography has a relatively short history in Tanzania, with the first camera arriving in the country in the 1860s. However, it wasn't until the 1950s and 60s that photography really began to take off in Tanzania, with the establishment of photography schools and clubs. Since then, Tanzanian photographers have made a name for themselves both locally and internationally, with many exhibiting their work in galleries and museums around the world.

    Styles and Techniques:

    Tanzanian photographers use a range of styles and techniques in their work, from traditional film photography to digital manipulation. Many photographers focus on capturing the natural beauty of Tanzania's landscapes and wildlife, with stunning images of the Serengeti, Ngorongoro Crater, and other natural wonders being a common theme.

    Other photographers focus on documenting the daily lives of Tanzanian people, capturing moments of joy, struggle, and everything in between. Street photography is also a popular genre in Tanzania, with many photographers capturing the vibrant energy of urban centers like Dar es Salaam and Arusha.

    Equipment:

    Tanzanian photographers use a range of equipment, from traditional film cameras to high-end digital cameras and lenses. However, due to the high cost of equipment, many Tanzanian photographers still shoot on film, and some even use homemade pinhole cameras to capture their images.

    Challenges:

    Like many African countries, Tanzania faces a number of challenges when it comes to photography, including limited access to equipment and resources, as well as censorship and restrictions on freedom of expression. Despite these challenges, however, Tanzanian photographers continue to produce stunning work that captures the beauty and complexity of their country and its people.

    Overall, photography is a growing and vibrant art form in Tanzania, with many talented photographers using their skills to document and celebrate the country's rich cultural heritage and natural beauty.

In conclusion, Tanzanian African art encompasses a rich and diverse array of artistic expressions, including Tingatinga paintings, sculptures, and masks. These art forms hold significant cultural, historical, and artistic value, reflecting Tanzania's rich heritage and traditions. From the ancient rock art to contemporary Tingatinga paintings, Tanzanian art is a testament to the creativity, skill, and cultural significance of its artists.

If you're interested in exploring and acquiring Tanzanian African art, our website, www.tingatingaart.com, offers a wide range of African paintings, including Tingatinga paintings, for sale. These vibrant and unique artworks are created by local Tanzanian artists and provide a beautiful and meaningful addition to any art collection. By supporting Tanzanian African art, you are not only appreciating its artistic value but also contributing to the preservation and promotion of Tanzania's rich cultural heritage. Explore our website and discover the beauty and diversity of Tanzanian African art today!



Size Guide

Centimeters (CM)

Inches (IN)

50CM x 40CM

19 11/16 in X 15 3/4 in

50CM x 50CM

19 11/16 in X 19 11/16 in

60CM x 60CM

23 5/8 in X 23 5/8 in

70CM x 50CM

27 9/16 in X 19 11/16 in

80CM x 60CM

31 1/2 in X 23 5/8 in

100CM x 80CM

39 3/8 in X 31 1/2 in

140CM x 110CM

55 1/8 in X 43 5/16 in