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Facts about the wildebeest migration

Facts about the wildebeest migration

September 20, 2018

Wildebeest, also called gnus, are members of the antelope family. They are related to oryxes and gazelles. A wildebeest can grow to 2.4 meters (8 feet) in length, and weigh up to 270 kilograms (600 pounds).

Wildebeest typically inhabit the Serengeti plains of southeastern Africa. For most of their lives, wildebeest graze in the grassy savannas and open woodlands of the plains, which straddle the nations of Tanzania and Kenya.

More than 1.5 million wildebeest migrate in an enormous loop every year. The annual migration northwest, at the end of the rainy season (usually in May or June) is recognized as one of the "Seven Wonders of the Natural World."

The search for greener pastures does not come without danger. Its migration route crosses many rivers, most filled with giant Nile crocodiles.

Each year, almost two million wildebeest and 20 000 plains game migrate from Tanzania's Serengeti to the south of Kenya's Masai Mara in search of lush grazing grounds and life-giving water. This treacherous odessey is dictated by the seasons and where the rains are, the wildebeest are not far behind. This epic journey from north to south spans almost 3000 kilometres and is virtually endless.

This great spectacle of nature is an iconic safari option for avid travellers, nature lovers and those who want a little more from their African experience. 

Rather than having a start or end point, the Great Migration moves rhythmically in a clockwise direction, making herd tracking unpredicatable. It is for this reason that our Herdtracker app was created; to help you track the wildebeests' movements and plan the safari of a lifetime. Choose from our existing safari packages or tailor-make your own journey according to your budget. 

Below, you'll find some useful resources that detail when to go, where to stay and what to expect along this unforgettable journey. Our experienced safari experts as well as affiliate camps and guides on the ground all work together to provide you with up-to-date information on where the herds are, as well as the predators that stalk them. 

 



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